Review of Granita in the Cadence Magazine

T
his record will be of limited appeal to many jazz fans,
but I think fans of avant-garde classical music will
like it. I could see listening to this in conjunction with
people like Earle Brown and John Cage. Indeed, as I
argued in an earlier issue, listeners not familiar with this
group would great difficulty determining whether the
music is improvised or composed. The music is completely improvised but after the recordings, the music
was put into “compositional form.”
According to the notes, while there are tracks listed, the
record is to be listened to as one continuous piece. The
tracks are listed as “jump in points.”  We are also told that
the title is an Italian desert, so the music may be a sweet
mouthful.
I did not find the music sweet, but rather heavy.  It is
primarily electronic sounds with occasional bursts by
sax, trumpet and piano. There is thematic development
in spots and continuity of sound and texture. Sometimes
it held my interest, and sometimes I wandered. But when
the record was finished I realized I missed the sound.
Which means I liked more than I thought.
On later playings I found more subtleties and started to
enjoy the record more. I especially like the last section
which features Schistek’s piano mixed with electronic
sounds.
Bernie Koenig

This review by Bernie Koenig was published on Cadence Magazine Oct Nov Dec 2012

This record will be of limited appeal to many jazz fans, but I think fans of avant-garde classical music will like it. I could see listening to this in conjunction with people like Earle Brown and John Cage. Indeed, as I argued in an earlier issue, listeners not familiar with this group would great difficulty determining whether the music is improvised or composed. The music is completely improvised but after the recordings, the music was put into “compositional form.” According to the notes, while there are tracks listed, the record is to be listened to as one continuous piece. The tracks are listed as “jump in points.”  We are also told that the title is an Italian desert, so the music may be a sweet mouthful.

I did not find the music sweet, but rather heavy.  It is primarily electronic sounds with occasional bursts by sax, trumpet and piano. There is thematic development in spots and continuity of sound and texture. Sometimes it held my interest, and sometimes I wandered. But when the record was finished I realized I missed the sound. Which means I liked more than I thought.

On later playings I found more subtleties and started to enjoy the record more. I especially like the last section which features Schistek’s piano mixed with electronic sounds.





One Response to “Review of Granita in the Cadence Magazine”

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hello….

wayne added these pithy words on Oct 27 14 at 2:52 am
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